Doctrinal Evolution (Jonathan Leeman)

In this Twitter thread, Jonathan Leeman warns of how, when we undergo doctrinal drift, “people outside of us began to notice a shift in tone and emphases. If they say something, our initial response can be defensive. ‘I haven’t changed. Look, same doctrines!’ Yet something has changed. Our sympathies and intuitions are no longer what they were.”

The Current Drift of the Evangelical World in North America (Mark Coppenger)

On this episode of The Sword and the Trowel, “Dr. Coppenger shares his insight as an elder statesman into the the current state of the Evangelical world in North America.”

On How We Speak of Sin

In a 2013 essay, Thabiti Anyabwile wrote regarding same-sex marriage, “Turns out that being civil about indecency actually hurts the traditional cause.” His point was that polite discourse about abominable behavior plays a role in normalizing such behavior. It is not difficult to see why that would be the case. Polite discourse minimizes and, over time, neutralizes the instinct of moral revulsion. While moral revulsion alone is not enough to sustain ethical practice over time, it is an important community-shaping element. Healthy communities express moral revulsion at that which is truly abominable, and the healthy effect of such revulsion is a natural deterrent toward said behavior within the community. People who are socialized into being appalled at what is appalling to God have the blessing of a moral compass shaped according to truth. Anyabwile’s “gag reflex” argument highlights an important component of the effects of our discourse about sin. It is entirely possible to speak of sin in a way that is technically correct, while still lacking entirely in true moral fiber, leading to the further erosion of social norms and the withering away of a protective moral revulsion.

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Women Preachers in the Southern Baptist Convention: Egalitarian Thought (Part 3)

Egalitarians base their argument for indifference with respect to gender in society, the home, and the pulpit on the idea that men and women are created equally. This post series has argued that when it comes to creation order and its implication for ‘gender roles’ in the church, Southern Baptists do not all differ from the world or from egalitarians. Recent rhetoric regarding women teaching, and even preaching, to men in the SBC, is of some concern. It seems like everywhere we turn, we find ourselves covered up in egalitarian patterns of thought.

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In Case You Missed It: “Letter from the ERLC Executive Committee” and “ERLC, EC trustee officers respond to task force announcement”

In case you missed it, here is an open letter from the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission Board of Trustees to the Executive Committee of the Southern Baptist Convention, and here is a Baptist Press article that includes the EC’s response.

Is the BFM 2000 View of Women in Ministry an Innovation? (Tom Nettles)

In this article, Tom Nettles responds to a post wherein, “Oklahoma Baptist Pastor Wade Burleson has attacked (again) the idea the Bible prohibits women from holding the New Testament position of pastor-bishop- elder.”

Women Preachers in the Southern Baptist Convention: But Wait, There’s Moore (Part 2)

In his 2006 article, “After Patriarchy, What? Why Egalitarians are Winning the Gender Debate” (Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society, vol. 49, no. 3, September 2006, pp. 569–76), Russell D. Moore describes how, “Egalitarians are winning the evangelical gender debate, not because their arguments are stronger, but because, in some sense, we are all egalitarians now.” (576) The current state of the SBC is even worse than Moore predicted. In fact, Moore seems to have not only given up on resisting what he calls a feminist movement, but may have contributed to it.

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Women Preachers in the Southern Baptist Convention: We Should Be Worried (Part 1)

There’s a common misconception going around in some circles that anyone who professes Christ yet believes women can be called to the pastorate or preach to men cannot be a true Christian. This is demonstrably untrue. When people believe that women can be preachers called by God it doesn’t necessarily mean those people aren’t Christian, it just means they’re wrong.

But what do the churches of the Southern Baptist Convention think? Southern Baptists reached an agreement about this issue a long time ago and they believe it’s not only theologically incorrect to have women preach, but sinful for women to take up the role of preaching as it goes against explicit commands given in God’s word. This is why women preaching in the Southern Baptist Convention is such an obviously divisive issue.

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BREAKING: “Pastors’ Conference meeting space contingent on program changes”

This Baptist Press article contains the Southern Baptist Convention Executive Committee’s recommendation to the 2020 Southern Baptist Pastors’ Conference and states, “The Executive Committee also requested that its staff develop written guidelines for future use of the meeting spaces at the SBC Annual Meeting; the Executive Committee anticipates reviewing those guidelines during its September 2020 meeting.”