Should women preach in church? | Ask Anything Live (Albert Mohler)

In this video, R. Albert Mohler, Jr. answers a question about whether or not women should preach in church.

Leave the SBC, Leave the Field

On October 21st Jeff Noblit, pastor of Grace Life Church of the Shoals and founder of Anchored in Truth Ministries announced via Twitter that he had asked his congregation to end fellowship with the Southern Baptist Convention.

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Prior to this announcement making the rounds on my Twitter feed I honestly had not ever heard the name Jeff Noblit.[1]  However, I now realize he has a significant footprint in Reformed Baptist circles – the very circles that I think offer the best hope for renewal in evangelicalism broadly and the SBC in particular.  Noblit’s influence appeared not just in retweets and discernment blog posts but in the general upswell of talk (again, on my Twitter feed) of talk about a large exodus of confessional and doctrinally-minded congregations from the SBC.

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New Liberalism and the Southern Baptist Convention: Religious Language

This post is the fourth in a series addressing New Liberalism and the Southern Baptist Convention. “New Liberalism” is a catch-all term for what some see as a theological threat similar to the liberalism of the previous century. This series does not assume that New Liberalism is in the SBC, but is intended to more clearly delineate the concept of New Liberalism in relation to the SBC.

The progenitors of the new progressivist tendency in Christianity might truly believe that they believe the Bible, might earnestly desire others to believe the Bible, and at the very least want others to believe that they believe the Bible. Thus sociological theories are read back into the text of Scripture in much the same way that scientific theories were read back into the text of Scripture, and especially Genesis 1-11, in the old liberalism. Terms are lifted from their texts to create a new Christianity commensurate with and thus subordinate to the spirit of the age.

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Movie Night: 1985 Southern Baptist Convention, Part 3

According to the video description, “This is the second part of the Tuesday afternoon and evening sessions of the historic 1985 annual meeting of the Southern Baptist Convention, held in Dallas, TX. Charles Stanley presided, and was re-elected president.”

New Liberalism and the Southern Baptist Convention: A Sociological Approach to Science

This post is the third in a series addressing New Liberalism and the Southern Baptist Convention. “New Liberalism” is a catch-all term for what some see as a theological threat similar to the liberalism of the previous century. This series does not assume that New Liberalism is in the SBC, but is intended to more clearly delineate the concept of New Liberalism in relation to the SBC.

If secondary, tertiary, and social matters of the Christian faith have come to the center of theological discourse within the SBC, then one cannot escape discussing them. The New Liberalism forces itself upon us. With it comes the exaltation of psychology and sociology in relation to the tenets of a strictly biblical Christian worldview. The idea is that ‘all truth is God’s truth,’ which is true enough in and of itself. However, the approach of the New Liberalism is prone to place parity between the authority of what we derive from nature and the authority of what we derive from Scripture such that the mind of man becomes the measure of all things, including Scripture. In such a system, the word of God is no longer the normative interpretive tool of the word of God, but the word of man, divorced from all but the ethical imperatives of Scripture. Works-righteousness is emphasized, and grace is de-emphasized, soteriologically and hermeneutically, as it were.

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A New Way to Understand Men and Women in Christ? A Review of Rachel Green Miller’s Beyond Authority and Submission (Steven Wedgeworth)

In this article, non-SBC author Steven Wedgeworth reviews Beyond Authority and Submission: Woman and Men in Marriage, Church, and Society by Rachel Green Miller, which he claims, “represents a growing new voice in what might be called post-complementarian literature. In it, Miller affirms the biblical teaching of male-only ordination in the church and the husband’s leadership in the family, but she seeks to correct what she considers an intrusion of unbiblical and even pagan assumptions into the traditional Reformed and Evangelical discourse.”

New Liberalism and the Southern Baptist Convention: Conservative Silence

This post is the second in a series addressing New Liberalism and the Southern Baptist Convention. “New Liberalism” is a catch-all term for what some see as a theological threat similar to the liberalism of the previous century. This series does not assume that New Liberalism is in the SBC, but is intended to more clearly delineate the concept of New Liberalism in relation to the SBC.

A divide between conservative and liberal ideologies within the Southern Baptist Convention is not as clear as it once was. No doubt this is partially the case because those considered ‘liberal’ are also those who are now outside the SBC, not in! At the same time, many of those who claim to affirm the conservative principles set forth in the Baptist Faith and Message 2000 also manage to look ‘liberal’ in a way their conservative predecessors did not. Some of the same causes that motivated liberals of yesteryear now motivate those who claim the mantle of the Conservative Resurgence. This is particularly true in terms of social engagement, and this fact alone has caused no shortage of speculation. Some attribute this difference to an unhealthy political partisanship of the past, but the point here goes deeper than support for the Moral Majority. While the purpose of this post is not to delve into specifics, the ‘culture’ of the CR is being called into question regarding the treatment of women, minorities, and homosexuals.

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Albert Mohler Offers 10 Points on Complementarianism in the SBC (Denny Burk)

In the video explained through this article, “Mohler offers ten points on complementarianism in our denominational life.”

New Liberalism and the Southern Baptist Convention: A Divisive Topic

This post is the first in a series addressing New Liberalism and the Southern Baptist Convention. “New Liberalism” is a catch-all term for what some see as a theological threat similar to the liberalism of the previous century. This series does not assume that New Liberalism is in the SBC, but is intended to more clearly delineate the concept of New Liberalism in relation to the SBC.

Concerns about theological liberalism in the Southern Baptist Convention are typically met with caution about unnecessary division in the SBC. The SBC survived decades of theological liberalism. Theological conservatives came out on top in what is known as the Conservative Resurgence. Some believe the beneficiaries of the CR would do well to enjoy the fruits of the CR rather than creating commotion where there need be none. But the beneficiaries of the CR would likewise do well not to listen to suggestions that we can now sit back on our haunches and wait while incremental cultural changes eat away at what we affirm about Christianity.

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